Archive

Tag Archives: photography

We flew into Murun this afternoon on our way to Khuvsgul National Park. A small deviation brought us to the collection of carved deer stones at Uushigiin Uver, believed to be 2500 to 4000 years old. The stones include carvings of deer, archery items, the sun and hunan heads.

The goats and sheep could care less.

We arrived at Lake Khuvghul around 7.00 pm in time for dinner, and the first guests of the season at this camp.

C336F9A2-34CA-4DF3-97B3-B7CA1268FB89906E115F-ED2D-454B-B172-7FFA05BD66B6

After a few hours driving through the Gobi’s changing scenery we took a walk through the rocky cliffs that form this canyon, where the ice holds on in parts of the valley floor way into summer.

A few vultures were spotted high in the sky and most birds and wildlife were too quick to catch. Herded animals however were in large supply in this national park. The rabbit-like animal is a pika.

Khongoryn Els – the largest sand dune in Mongolia. Persistence paid off for Himself who managed to climb to the top in just over an hour. On the slide down he also made the dunes sing with the movement of sand in front of him.

That was the day’s highlight for him. As for me, I had my first shower for a few days. Sheer luxury.

Here is our driver and guide with Rob perusing Monday’s route.

img_5171

The word Bayanzag means “rich in saxual shrubs” and the plants serve the purpose of drawing water to the surface assisting to make this landscape habitable.

An American palaeontologist called Roy Chapman Andrews coined the phrase Flaming Cliffs. The area is known for the number of dinosaur bones and eggs excavated here.

Our home for the night was a very small homestay with a walk across the Gobi to the toilet and wash tap.

lrg_dsc06090

We took an afternoon walk to enjoy the sand whipping around some of the smaller red outcrops.

After dinner we learned some of the many games you can play with bone knuckles.

 

Three original temples stand at Erdene Zuu Khiid, the site of the first Buddhist Monastery in Mongolia. The buildings dating between 1586 and 1610 are now museums, having survived the Stalinist purge of 1937.

The city of Kharkhorin (established by the son of Genghis Khan as the capital) is the home to an impressive archaeological museum showcasing finds in this region and beyond.