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It was a very short space of time between hearing a hearty chorus of kookaburra laughter in the backyard tree and racing out with camera at the ready for some regular bird shots.

I did not expect to see this poor skink breathe its last breath in the beak of this bird. These are not the sharpest pics I’ve ever taken, but they certainly capture the drama of the moment.

Kookaburra and skink 1

Kookaburra and skink 1 bKookaburra and skink 2Kookaburra and skink 3

Saturday 27 July

We arrived in Kununurra yesterday afternoon after decamping tents in the National Park and then back to the road junction to pack up the vans for the trek up the bitumen through scenery that included massive orange ranges and baobab trees. You have no idea what it felt like to see a large body of water after so long.

Today is a rest day (cough). As the upright fridge in the trailer died, we need more fridge capacity for a) food on the Gibb River Road or b) beer on the Gibb River Road, depending on who you ask.

The rest day has included washing clothes, repacking the van and car, purchasing a supplementary car fridge for the food/beer, replacing a mat in the van that scored a big olive oil hit, shopping for food (the beer and wine was purchased last night), and buying additional hot weather clothing for Himself.

Kununurra - Google Map

Before breakfast, I wandered down to show you the view that we have from our site on Lily Creek Lagoon in this large service town for the district.  Before you look at them, know that we are heading off again tomorrow in search of more dirt, rocks and corrugations as we have become so fond of them. Know also, dear ones, that I will be bringing you up to date wherever and whenever Telstra has seen fit to provide coverage.

Morning on Lake ArgyleLake Argyle morning birds 4Morning panorama - Lake ArgyleLake Argyle morning birds 1Lake Argyle morning birds 3Lake Argyle morning birds 2

In Michael Morcombe and David Stewart’s excellent Australian Birds app, the blue-winged kookaburra is described thus:

“More colourful than [the] Laughing Kookaburra but has rather unpleasant, staring white eyes.”

You be the judge.

The first three photos are of one visitor who popped in around dinner time on our first camping night in Purnululu National Park. He was so impressive (and somewhat of a poser) that I felt he deserved a post of his own.  He returned the next morning with two mates.

Note that he is not called the Blue winged Laughing Kookaburra like his eastern less colourful cousin. That is because he has the unfortunate incapacity to complete the laugh sequence. His colour, though, is sufficient compensation for his vocal limitations.

Blue winged Kookaburra 3Blue winged Kookaburra stare

Blue winged Kookaburra 2

What? Blue winged kookaburras